Condatis is a decision support tool to identify the best locations for habitat creation and restoration.  For an introduction, watch the video below.

COND_Anim_Splash
More information on the way Condatis works, along with screenshots and a summary of the underlying theory can be found here

Condatis is a user-friendly, open source program, which is available to anyone. It is released under the GNU General Public Licence version 3 with one additional permitted term: read the licence.

The Condatis software runs on Windows and Unix-like operating systems such as Mac OS X and Linux. Condatis is written in Python 2.7.

Credits

Condatis is written by David W. Wallis and Jenny A. Hodgson at the University of Liverpool. You can email us at contact@condatis.org.uk. You can request to be added to our mailing list to receive notifications about workshops, or new versions.

We would always love to hear about how Condatis has been useful to you, e.g. by email. Contact us.

Condatis was developed with the expert advice and guidance of a number of partner organisations. We are enormously grateful for their continued support for this project.

Buglife

B-Lines

natural%20england

Chief Scientists Report

durham%20wildlife%20trust

Brightwater

lancashire%20wildlife%20trust

The Carbon Landscape

rspb

Futurescapes

yorkshire%20wildlife%20trust

Living Landscapes

scottish%20natural%20heritage

Climate Change Scotland

Forest%20Research

Climate Change

Preferred Citation

There is much confusion about the best way to cite software when you write up the results of your analyses. If you can remember to, please check back to this page to get the latest preferred citation at the time when you write up.

A minimal citation should include

  • Author: David W. Wallis and Jenny A. Hodgson
  • Title: Condatis; software to assist with the planning of habitat restoration
  • Version: [whatever you used]
  • URL: www.condatis.org.uk

Thanks to Zenodo.org, our software also has a DOI which is10.5281/zenodo.13951 for version 0.6.0.

The current best way to cite the underlying scientific method is to cite Hodgson et al (2012) PLoS ONE 7(10): e47141 DOI link

Download the software

Frequently asked questions

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